Meal Plan for Eating Disorder Recovery

Breakfast  
Thick sourdough bread slathered in real butter and strawberry preserves. Whole milk blended up with protein powder and almond butter. This is my Monday morning breakfast.

Wait a minute, gluten-filled bread? Real butter and whole milk? Blasphemy! This is a gluten –free and dairy-free blog, right?

That time has passed. I am welcoming in all the foods. No restrictions.

I have battled an eating disorder for ten years. Evidence of that is written all over this blog. Last fall I recommitted to weekly therapy sessions with an ED (eating disorder) specialist, and as I described Sparkle Kitchen in our first meeting the fog began to lift. My special protocols and elimination diets were blatantly feeding my disease.  


Snack  
Cheddar cubes and raw carrots. 10am snack.

My therapist recommends using the following guideline to avoid any ED triggers:

Breakfast
Snack
Lunch
Snack
Dinner
Snack

I was intermittent fasting when I met my current therapist. And I was spiraling into daily panic attacks and binging to calm myself. It wasn’t pretty. Any type of restrictive diet sets my eating disorder in motion so the daily meal guide above allows me to feel safe; safety in knowing that another meal is in sight and I don’t have to compensate for eating more or less.


Lunch
Salmon sushi with a mixed greens salad.

Sometimes food isn’t the solution.  I believed eating the most nourishing foods would cure my ailments. All the pain and discomfort of a leaky gut would resolve itself if I just followed the right diet.

Diet can help if you know what your body needs. But I didn’t know, I was merely guessing.  

I enlisted the help of a nutritional biochemist to run a full panel of testing. The results were more or less expected. Minor case of leaky gut, no gluten sensitivity, a bit of candida overgrowth, very low zinc levels and my thyroid T3 and T4 hormones were in the functionally low range.

Three years of sardines, organ meats, coconut oil, seaweed and bone broth and I still had these issues.

The nutritional biochemist suggested a series of supplements over a three-month period. No custom diet. I eat anything and everything.

My therapist explained how denying certain foods can put your body in shock when it does encounter a “forbidden” treat. Whether this is founded in science I’m uncertain, but I can definitely attest to the placebo effect. Sugar is/was my trigger food and every time I indulged I would feel awful, full blown sugar hangover. Ninety percent of that is/was guilt. Guilt of putting a “no” food into my body and the possibility of it impacting my weight.


Snack
Plain yogurt and banana. Or chocolate chips stirred into crunchy peanut butter.


Dinner
Sautéed bok choy, chicken burger.

I spent a week in the hospital in college. The result was misdiagnosed Crohn’s disease.

I’d suffered from severe abdominal pain since both my parents remarried at age ten. At the time, no one thought to correlate the two and I traveled from doctor to doctor for years with no accurate diagnosis.

Stress wreaks havoc on our bodies, taking shape in a myriad of ailments. Mine rooted in my bowels.  I didn’t have the necessary tools to process my stress as a child so my body responded the only way it knew how, stomach pain. While I suppressed the emotional pains of my life, my abdomen did the screaming instead.


Snack
Glass of milk and a bit of dark chocolate.

Improv comedy has the “Yes, and…” rule of thumb that I’ve incorporated into my eating philosophy.  I say “yes” to all the foods. And add a scoop of ice cream to my slice of pie.

Zucchini Noodle Greek Pasta

Zucchini Noodle Greek Pasta
Makes 4 servings.

4 cups spiralized zucchini noodles
½ cup radishes, sliced
1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and chopped
14-16 shrimp, peeled, frozen or raw
1 tablespoon olive oil, divided
½ teaspoon salt
2-3 teaspoons seasoning mix (recipe below)
½ teaspoon fish sauce
¼ cup parsley

SEASONING MIX
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon basil
¼ teaspoon thyme
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon dill
½ teaspoon marjoram
½ teaspoon arrowroot starch
½ teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

  • Preheat oven to 375.
  • Toss radishes and asparagus with ½ tablespoon olive oil and ¼ teaspoon salt. Roast 15 minutes. Set aside.
  • In a large pot, bring 6 cups of water to a boil. Add the shrimp and boil 3 minutes until pink. Drain water and set aside.
  • In a large skillet, add ½ tablespoon olive oil over medium heat. Add the zucchini noodles, sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon salt and sauté for 3-5 minutes.
  • Pour the zucchini noodles, shrimp and roasted vegetables into a large bowl. Add in the seasoning mix, fish sauce and parsley. Stir until well incorporated.
  • Serve warm or room temperature.

Enjoy!

Zucchini Noodle Greek Pasta

Dairy-free Ice Cream

On Sunday I took my first hike of the season. It was a spectacular, sunny day and and the whole time I was thinking: ice cream! So when I got home I went straight to the store to buy everything needed to make dairy-free ice cream.

The summer is torture for a dairy-free girl. Ice cream trucks are sending their melodic call, new gelato places open-up, kids are passing with cones dripping down their shirts and I can’t have any of it. A few coconut ice cream brands are on the market but they’re only available at larger grocery stores and typically have unnecessary additives and too much sugar. So I came up with a recipe to satisfy my ice cream dreams.

This dairy-free ice cream is creamy, melty and the perfect amount of sweetness. And if you’re not a coconut fan this is still a good option for you. My husband despises all things coconut and he loves this. I actually have to divide it into two containers with “his” and “her” labels so he doesn’t eat mine!

Enjoy!

 Dairy-free Ice Cream

 

Dairy-free Ice Cream
Yields 2
Rich and creamy dairy-free ice cream made with coconut milk.
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
6 hr
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
6 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 can organic full-fat coconut milk
  2. 1 tbsp maple syrup
  3. 1 tsp vanilla
Instructions
  1. Turn the coconut milk can upside down and open from the bottom. The milk separates into water and cream. Add the entire contents of the can into a blender.
  2. Add in the maple syrup and vanilla. Blend for 3 minutes until smooth.
  3. Line a 9”x13” baking pan with parchment paper, wrapping the paper to the outside edges.
  4. Pour the coconut mix into the pan and place in the freezer for 6 hours or more.
  5. Once frozen, lift the parchment paper from the edges and begin breaking up the coconut milk pieces. Place these into a blender and blend until smooth. You may need to allow the coconut mix to soften before adding it to the blender depending upon your blender’s strength.
Sparkle Kitchen http://sparklekitchen.com/
Dairy-free Ice Cream